This sophisticated scheme is growing fast,

costing consumers and companies big money. 

Here’s how to prevent becoming

a victim of a bogus email involving your money or Danaher.

How it works

Bad folks research the names, phone numbers and email addresses of executives, employees or consumers who have access to money such as a corporate bank account or a consumer’s real estate closing funds. 

The fraudsters, often involved with organized crime, send emails and make phone calls pretending to be an executive, an attorney or someone in authority. They instruct the recipient to wire money to the bad guys’ account. 

The victim is convinced the urgent communication (often labeled “confidential”) is legitimate, wants to do the right thing and follows instructions to wire the funds immediately.

Funds are transferred from the victim’s bank account into a bank account controlled by the organized crime group. Once the wire transfer is made, the victim usually has no recourse to get the money back.

Click here to download 

and print these steps to identify and avoid responding to bogus requests for money.

Sources: FBI, law.com, Realtor Daily News,

Washington Post, Barkly, Trend Micro, TechTarget

How to stay safe

Slow down! Just because a communication is labeled “Urgent!” and appears to come from someone in charge doesn’t mean you should act right away. Take time to double-check that the email or phone call is legit.  

Remember, bad actors know how to “spoof” an email address so it appears to be coming from someone important. Double-check by contacting the company or executive directly, not using contact information contained in the email. 

Know that documents, invoices or requests for an employee’s W-2 or other sensitive information that appear to come from a trusted colleague, attorney, vendor or executive may look real, but could be fake. 

If you are the victim of wire fraud, contact the financial institution immediately to see if the funds transfer can be reversed. Talk to the bank’s financial crimes division to request that the recipient’s account be frozen. 

Business Money Transfers _ Danaher.001.j

DID THE BOSS REALLY SEND YOU THAT URGENT EMAIL? The number of cases where fraudsters masquerade as company executives and send emails designed to trick employees has doubled over the past 12 months. Crooks use realistic-looking executive email addresses to send urgent messages, instructing employees to wire company funds or send sensitive company information. Beazley Data says employees should be suspicious of any unexpected urgent, unusual email requests that appear to come from an executive.

Beware of an email that appears to come from your employer's personnel department or payroll service. in some cases, the email instructs you to update the bank account where your paycheck is direct deposited. Entering your account information gives fraudsters access to it.

Or in the example below, the email instructs you to click and download a document from the "payroll company." Doing so will install malware on the computer. 

You can spot clues that this is a phishing email by clicking on the slider bar below and dragging it from left to right.

Beware of an email that appears to come from your employer's personnel department or payroll service. in some cases, the email instructs you to update the bank account where your paycheck is direct deposited. Entering your account information gives fraudsters access to it.

Or in the example below, the email instructs you to click and download a document from the "payroll company." Doing so will install malware on the computer. 

You can spot clues that this is a phishing email by grabbing the slider bar below and dragging it from left to right.

Source: IBM Security

June 2019 b • Edition #72

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